ADA Accessibility Information
Accessibility

A
A

A
Metropolitan Dental Speciality Group Staff in PPE

Metropolitan Dental Speciality Group Jeanneth Staff Member in PPE
Photograph from Metropolitan Dental Specialty Group of dental tools used for extraction in Silver Spring, MD

Tooth Extraction
Silver Spring, MD



We extract teeth when restoration is not an option. Having a tooth extracted is always performed as a way to strengthen the patient's oral health; we don’t take extractions lightly. Working with our staff at Metropolitan Dental Specialty Group, we will examine the tooth, discuss options, and then create a treatment plan, which may include the extraction of a tooth. We can then discuss post-extraction options which may include orthodontics, the placement of a dental bridge, dental implant, or more.

When are teeth Extracted?


In general, it is best to maintain and protect your natural teeth, though this may not always be the best option. We will evaluate each patient’s specific situation and discuss all possible treatment options.

Tooth extraction may be the best decision for your oral health in situations including:
•  Insufficient Tooth Structure: Teeth can be cracked and fractured from impact injuries, having too much force placed on it, or from the tooth being weakened. In many scenarios, we can repair the tooth with a dental crown, or an inlay or onlay. In other scenarios, too much of the natural tooth structure has fractured to be able to place a prosthetic. In this situation, extraction of the tooth may be necessary. This would then be followed with restoration options, as we would not want the missing tooth to cause havoc in your mouth.
•  Tooth is Impacted: An impacted tooth is a tooth that is unable to fully extend above the gum line. It may be partially or fully impacted. The most often discussed impacted teeth are the third row of molars, known as the wisdom teeth, though any tooth can be impacted. An impacted tooth is a problem because it allows space for bacteria to dip under the gum line, making it difficult to remove, and easy to cause infection. In some cases we are able to remove the gum tissue and help the tooth be exposed, or an orthodontist can help the tooth extend. Otherwise, the tooth will require extraction to protect your oral health.
•  To Correct Your Bite: Orthodontists may request a tooth to be extracted prior to braces or another corrective device. This often causes confusion in patients who feel that it can sometimes be good to lose a tooth for extra space, the difference being that when an orthodontist requests this, the neighboring teeth are then moved in a controlled manner. When a tooth is lost without that control, havoc can occur with neighboring teeth movement, leading to large oral health issues including bruxism and TMJ dysfunction.
•  Irreparable Damage: Sometimes a tooth can be damaged from decay so severely that it is beyond repair. Generally, a tooth with severe decay requires a root canal procedure to eliminate infection from inside the tooth. In an effort to save the tooth, we may first perform a root canal. Though it is always best to attempt restoration, it is not always successful and then extraction may be needed.
•  Periodontal Treatment: Patients who suffer from chronic periodontal disease can find that a lot of tissue damage occurs, gum tissue can recess, jaw bone damage can occur, and the tooth can become loose. We want to restore the tissue health, and that may begin with the extraction of the tooth and then creating a treatment plan to rebuild the tissue and then place a dental prosthetic. For some patients, this may include the placement of a denture. We can permanently secure a denture device using the All-on-4® Treatment Concept.