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Metropolitan Dental Speciality Group Staff in PPE

Metropolitan Dental Speciality Group Jeanneth Staff Member in PPE
Does an Unbrushed Tongue Increase the Risk of Gum Disease Development?
Posted on 6/22/2020 by Metropolitan Dental Specialty Group
Does an Unbrushed Tongue Increase the Risk of Gum Disease Development?

Understanding why and how we develop gum disease is critical in determining how to effectively treat and prevent it. While there are a number of factors that go into developing oral health issues such as heart disease or diabetes, poor oral hygiene and unhealthy/high sugar diets, today we want to take a closer look at how bacteria on the tongue can contribute to the onset of dental conditions:

Periodontitis Begins with Mouth or Tongue Bacteria



The truth is that when it comes to brushing, most of us do not follow the prescribed method endorsed by the ADA and just about every dentist. Two minutes of steady, firm-but-not-hard brushing in a circular motion. But within that half-hearted brushing that we are doing, we are also neglecting the proper cleaning of our tongue. In fact, many people admit to forgetting to brush their tongue frequently. Bacteria start out with food particles left after eating. They then begin to spread and the longer they are left unchecked, the more they contribute to the development of gum disease.

It Can Ultimately Lead to Tooth Decay and Loss



When tongue hygiene and cleanliness get ignored, the bacteria fester and grow at an increasing rate. In addition to the increased risk of gum disease, poorly brushed tongues are most often times the cause of bad breath as well. This is an early warning sign of the potential for gingivitis, and after that, Periodontitis later on.

Even the early stages of gum disease are something that you need to see a professional dentist about now. For more information, please feel free to contact us as soon as you can. In the meantime, make sure that you give as much attention to brushing your tongue as you do to your teeth and gums.